Learn Korean with Kpop: Ravi ‘Flower Garden’ Chorus English Translation

There’s actually not a whole lot of Korean in this one! But I want to translate the song so figured why not do a post.

(I forgot that translating Ravi’s stuff is near impossible, even with a native’s help)

Korean

You’re like one hundred roses, daisy, cherry blossom, baby

너의 향이 가득하게 배인 난 sunflower

You’re like one hundred tulips, ivys, dandelion, baby

아득한 공간 너와 내 꽃밭

English

You’re like one hundred roses, daisy, cherry blossom, baby

Your scent permeates the air, my sunflower

You’re like one hundred tulips, ivys, dandelion, baby

You in my garden, like a distant realm

~ Breakdown ~

너의 향이 가득하게 배인 난 sunflower

Your scent permeates the air, my sunflower

너의 is ‘너’, the informal ‘you’, and the possesive particle -의.

향이 is scent, but as relates to flowers or perfume. It isn’t a general smell.

가득하게 is the verb 가득하다, meaning ‘to surround’. It means that something surrounds or fills an area. When you drop the -다 from a verb you get the stem. Add -게 to the end to turn it into an adverb.

배인 is the verb 배다, meaning ‘to permeate’. In this form it is an adjective.

난 is 나, the informal I/me and the topic particle ㄴ/는.

Songs are a bit odd, sometimes the wrong word is written or grammar js used improperly to make it sound good. So in this case 난 actually functions as 내, meaning ‘my’.

아득한 공간 너와 내 꽃밭

You in my garden, like a distant realm

Note: Literally it says ‘A distant realm, you and my garden’. But because it’s a song, you have to take a bit more liberty and add words and adjust the lines to make them sound good in a new language. You keep the meaning and change the structure. If it was translated literally it would include the location particle -에.

아득한 is the adjective form 아득하다, meaning ‘to be distant’. When you add ㄴ to the stem it turns it into an adjective that modifies the word that comes after it.

공간 means ‘realm’

너와 is ‘너’, the informal ‘you’, and -와. 와 is added to nouns ending in a vowel to mean ‘and’. (-과 is added to nouns ending in a consonant).

내 is ‘my’. Technically you could write it as 나의, but Koreans most often write and say it as ‘내’, similar to how we say ‘I’m’ instead of ‘I am’.

꽃밭 means ‘flower garden’. The same as english, the thing being possessed comes after the thing doing to possessing.

~ Vocab ~

꽃밭

Flower Garden

공간

Realm

아득하다

To be distant

배다

To permeate

가득하다

To surround/fill an area

향이

Scent/Perfume

~ Hannah

Published by Satyanghae Korean (Hannah & Shelbi)

We are just 3 students who wish to share the love and joy of learning Korean through lesson posts and translations! We are doing this for fun, based on our experience and questions we ask native speakers. We are not fluent! Just passionate  ~ Hannah, Shelbi, and Jordan

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