Winter Weather

진눈깨비

sleet

진눈깨비가 오다

for sleet to come

진눈깨비가 내리다

for sleet to fall

눈이 오다

for snow to come (snowing)

눈이 내리다

for snow to fall (snowing)

눈이 쌓이다

for snow to pile up (stick to the ground)

눈송이

snowflake

눈보라

blizzard

눈보라 몰아치다

for a blizzard to strike

폭설

heavy snow fall

폭설이 내리다

for heavy snow to fall

첫눈

1st snowfall

첫눈 오다

for the first snow to fall (of the season)

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진눈깨비가 싫어요

I hate sleet

진눈깨비가 내리면 길에서 운전하기가 위험해져요

Driving on the roads is dangerous when it is sleeting

폭설로 인해 길이 막힐 것 같아요

I think the roads will be blocked by heavy snow

눈보라를 조심하세요

Be careful of the blizzard / take precautions

눈이 쌓이면 좋겠어요!

I hope the snow sticks!

눈송이 하나하나가 모두 특별해요
Each snowflake is unique

KSL Formality (존댓말 있나요?)

Hey guys! To make this blog one sentence, yes. 반말 style signs tend to be more short and curt while 존댓말 signs are done more fully. There’s also your body language indicating politeness vs more casual closeness. And of course the infamous “you”. In 존댓말 you put your hand out, palm facing up, with finger outstretched while in 반말 you just point at the person. (seen at 1:02 in the above video).

Throughout this blog I will refer to time stamps of the below video for example of formal vs informal speaking through sign language and give brief descriptions of what is happening. I will also add another video at the end of another youtuber saying the same kinds of things except her video has English captioning. Keep in mind that I am not native and still working on my listening skills, so if I made a mistake just let me know. I understand the gist more than I do every single word (and I understand the signs more than the spoken *cries*)

From 0:18 to 0:33 he is talking about how the honorific words themselves don’t exist in sign language. (such as 댁 instead of 집. by the way, the 에 particle he is signing is 장소. 에 and 에서 are signed as 장소 meaning location)

0:53-1:05 demonstrating how to say thanks if one of his kids were to give him candy “사탕 줬어? 오 고마워 You’re giving it to me? oh, thanks!”

1:07-1:28 here he talks about how if his teacher were to give him a gift, the sign he uses is the exact same, but his body (language) is different.

1:28-1:54 When speaking to someone under you (like his kid) he can speak easily and make eye contact, but when talking to someone higher than you it’s like how dare you bother them (감히 -> impudently/how dare you)

1:55-1:59 asking a child their age: 너 나이 몇 살이니? “how old are you?”

1:59-2:22 talking about how the formal word for 나이 (연세) doesn’t exist. From 2:16 to 2:17 you see him do the sign that other videos translated as “몇 실입니까?” (he says 몇 살이니 but he is talking about the phrase as a whole “when asking, how old are you, to a grandfather”.

2:29-2:41 “할아버지.. 죄송하지만.. 혹시혹시.. 나이 알려주시면 좋을 것 같은데.. sir… excuse me… but perhaps… I think it’d be good if you could share your age…” (I couldn’t understand the spoken after 주시 so I asked a native for the rest lol)

And then after that, he recaps saying that 존댓말 doesn’t exist but if you speak easily and comfortably it’s like 반말.

START AT 2:50 TO SEE HER EXPLANATION OF HOW IT DIFFERS

For my video listed first, I basically combined what I learned from both of their videos lol

HOPE THIS WAS HELPFUL!

~Shelbi

When and How to Switch to 반말

This post goes hand in hand with Hannah’s! She gave you real life examples of how she experienced a switch that you can read here-> ( https://satyanghaekorean.org/2021/11/07/a-note-on-korean-formalities-dropping-them-examples/ )

Remember that I am not native, so this is just my own conjecture based on the response given by my language partner to a sample conversation where 존댓말 is used and suddenly dropped once the elder finds out they are older:

IMPORTANT NOTE
He said it really depends on the context of the situation and the individual person you are talking to. There really is no “set rule”

WHEN CAN I FREELY USE IT
With people who are OBVIOUSLY children and with fellow classmates (primary and middle school. I recently learned this doesnt necessarily hold true in highschool. In Korea, strangers are owed a level of respect despite age). Since koreans count age by year vs actual date of birth, you are technically the same age as everyone in your class, so you can freely use 반말 (at least til high school)

SO WHEN CAN I USE IT?
If you find out the person is younger than you, you DO NOT automatically switch to 반말 of your own accord! You either ask for permission, or permission is granted.

SO HOW DO I GET PERMISSION?
The older person can ask the younger permission by saying 말 놔도 되요?

grammatically correct= 말 놓아도 돼요
(놓아 is often spelled as 놔 due to pronunciation)

놓다- release/let go of

literal translation- Can I let go of words?

The younger can give the elder permission by saying:
  말 놓으세요– Please let go of words (you can speak casually)

People of the same age:
말 놓을 까요? = Shall we let go of words? (shall we speak comfortably?
반말 할까요? Shall we do 반말? (speak casually)

WHEN IS IT OK TO ASK TO DROP WORDS?
This is when the individual person and your closeness is key

It can seem rude if the elder asks to speak casually (you are still strangers afterall, which requires a level of respect in korea)

It can be rude for the younger who feels close to the elder to ask to speak casually (as the elder deserves a level of respect and may not feel close enough to the younger)

If your same age and past middle school stage, you are still strangers which deserves a level of respect so it can still come off as rude. (He told me he was roommates with someone of same age and they used 존댓말 for about 3 months)

HOW TO NOT COME OFF AS RUDE?
Use 존댓말 until you are given permission to drop it as even koreans struggle with this at times (just my opinion though)

INTERNET SETTING= SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCE
As the internet is extremely informal it has lax rules

He said someone switching to 반말 once finding out theyre older on here is acceptable as we are just conversating; however, doing so to their face (in person) can seem rude.

Feel free to add your own takes on this in the comments!

To sum up this blog, always always use 존댓말 unless you received permission to use 반말

[image source|http://m.nk.chosun.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=8545]

귀멸 meaning (Demon Slayer title translation

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귀멸 -> 귀신을 멸하다

The hanja for 귀신 (鬼) Is defined as

  1. spirit/ghost
  2. soul (dead person’s spirit)
  3. Dokkaebi 

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The hanja for 멸하다 (滅) is defined as

  1. become put out/extinguished/turned off
  2. to put out/extinguish/turn off
  3. to annihilate / completely get rid of

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칼날 -> blade (“The thin sharp part of a knife/sword that cuts things”) 

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I skimmed through several scenes and they refer to the “demons” as 도깨비 (Dokkaebi/goblin) so I chose this for my breakdown:

Dokkaebi Terminating Blade

You can see why it’s called “demon slayer” 😅

(I know this is the Korean title, but it’s pretty much the same in Japanese. I am not confident enough with Japanese to break it down like this though)

Should I Study Hanja?

WHAT IS HANJA

Before Korea had a writing system, they used Chinese characters. This is why it is usually scientific/educational type words that have a native Korean AND a Chinese based word. The Chinese based word is used in science/school/more formal type contexts while the native Korean word is most often used in a typical conversation (its like “human” vs “homo sapien”)


한자
This refers to the written characters.

한자어
This refers to speaking. if you ask “A vs B” and get told “A is 한자어” they mean that A is based off of chinese. aka “sino korean word”

☆~~~~~~~~~~~~~~¤~~~~~~~~~~~~~~☆

SHOULD I LEARN IT?

It is not necessary, though it can be helpful!

It can be helpful because you can get a better understanding of chinese based words. I think it can help to at least understand how hanja is broken down (which we will cover in a minute)

Koreans study in school and end up not remembering much since they usually write Chinese based words purely in hangul anyways. But they do remember some to an extent. You may see it on store signs or handwritten messages, but through a normal texting convo or reading a book, you most likely aren’t going to encounter it.

☆~~~~~~~~~~~~~~¤~~~~~~~~~~~~~~☆

THE BREAKDOWN

If you look up a word on naver and it is chinese based, there will be hanja beside it. Hanja are broken down into meaning and pronunciation. Some hanja look different, but have the same pronunciation with  different meanings  Some hanja look and sound the same, but can have multiple meanings

characters are defined as “meaning pronunciation”. If the “meaning” is a verb, it’s often in future tense (not always)

부수 -> radical
획수-> number of strokes


A radical is like the foundation of the character. Hanja can be looked up in the dictionary based on radical, or strokes. Next to the radical, in parenthesis, it will be defined with its number of strokes.

☆~~~~~~~~~~~~~~¤~~~~~~~~~~~~~~☆

EXAMPLES

IF YOU LOOK UP 소녀 , YOU WILL NOTICE IT HAS CHINESE BESIDE IT.

SO YOU CAN LOOK UP THESE PARTS INDIVIDUALLY TO GET A BETTER UNDERSTANDING.
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少 (소)

To the side it says 적을 소, 젊을 소
This means it has a couple meanings, but read the same way. the first meaning is 적을 (from 적다) this means “few”. the second is 젊을 (from 젊다) meaning “young age”

소녀 (少女) young girl
-> 女 is for female
 소식 (少食) snack/small meal. "to eat a little"
-> 食 is for eating/meal


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火花 (화화)
different hanja, same sound!

화 (火) means fire (and is the hanja used for tuesday)
화 (花) means flower/flower shaped
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太陽 (태양)
태 (太) means “big”

양 (陽) means “sunlight” / “energy beating down from sun”

sun beating down energy



☆~~~~~~~~~~~~~~¤~~~~~~~~~~~~~~☆

CONCLUSION

If you know hanja, you can sometimes guess a word based on its parts. Some hanja sound the same (like with 화 and 화! so you won’t always be able to guess meaning based off hangul alone, but you can if you see the hanja for that word. If you see a word with hanja, looking at the possible definitions for the hanja used can help you get a better/more clear understanding of that word^^

HOW TO LEARN

I mostly just learn like I showed you in the breakdown section (by googling hanja I’m interested in). I also have this book that I really love! They have an ebook version (not available in all countries) that is half the price of the physical book. They start with a dialogue using Korean and Hanja so you can not only pick some up from context, but use it as a review to see what you remembered. They also have practice exercises and a “Find more Hanja” section where they combine Hanja you just learned as well as Hanja you learned from previous chapters so you can learn even more words. In the back of the book you can find stroke order and English translation for each chapter (no answer key, but you can find the answers by reviewing the chapter). The explanations are in English, but the instructions for the practice exercises are in Korean. So this book is also good for reviewing and enhancing your korean while also learning Hanja!

Hope this was helpful!

-Shelbi

A note on Korean formalities (& dropping them) + Examples

*・゚゚・*:.。..。.:*゚:*:✼✿  ✿✼:*゚:.。..。.:*・゚゚・*

Hey guys! I was just thinking about formalities earlier and wanted to share my experience with different Koreans and dropping formalities.

Formalities are extremely important to the Korean language. 존댓말, or formal speech, should be used with people you don’t know, people who are older than you, or people who are in authority. 반말, or informal speech, can be used with people younger than you or with your friends. But the problem is that there aren’t clear lines here. HOW much older and HOW much younger? How do you know if someone is your friend?

Continue reading “A note on Korean formalities (& dropping them) + Examples”

Fortnite Announcement Screen Korean vs English + Vocab List

~ ~ ~

Now my deep dark secret is out and everyone knows I play Fortnite. I blame my friend for convincing me to play it with him as a social activity.

Continue reading “Fortnite Announcement Screen Korean vs English + Vocab List”

Christmas Day 크리스마스 날

크리스마스 
christmas

메리 크리스마스 
merry christmas! 

크리스마스 트리
christmas tree 


star

흐리다
to be cloudy

선물 
gift / present

크리스마스 트리 아래에 선물을 놓다
to put a present under the tree

선물을 받다 
to receive a gift 

선물을 주다 
to give a gift

선물을 풀다
to open/unwrap a gift
(풀다 is to untie/unwind/undo)

선물 포장지
 wrapping paper
(literal “gift wrapping”. 포장지 is a wrapper. 사탕 포장지 is a candy wrapper)

선물을 포장하다
 to wrap a gift

이거 포장 좀 해주시겠어요?
 can you wrap this for me please? (more properly, 이거 should be 이것을)

 
snow

눈송이
snowflake

눈사람 
snowman

눈사람을 만들다
 to make/build a snowman

눈사람 프로스티 / 프로스티 더 스노우맨
 frosty the snowman

잭 프로스트 
jack frost

설인 
abominable snowman / yeti
(the hanja is  雪人
 人 인 is for person and 雪 설 is snow. in other words, this is also literally “snow person” just like snowman)

지팡이 사탕 / 캔디 케인 
candy cane
(지팡이 is a cane! just as literal as english~)

눈이 쌓이다
 for snow to pile up (this means the snow is sticking)

눈이 오다 / 내리다
 for snow to come/fall (doesn’t necessarily mean that it is sticking though. just that it is snowing) 

산타할아버지 / 산타클로스 
santa

산타할머니 / 미시즈 클로스
 mrs clause

엘프
elf

루돌프
 rudolph

순록
reindeer

천사 
angel 

눈천사 
snow angel 

눈천사를 만들다
to make a snow angel

징글벨 
jingle bell


 bell

썰매 
sleigh

썰매를 타다
 to ride a sleigh / sled

굴뚝 
chimney

굴뚝을 타고 내려오다
 to come down the chimney
(literal, to ride the chimney and come falling down. but the kind of fall down like how rain falls, not a trip kinda fall)

종소리가 울리다
 for a bell to ring
(소리 is noise and 울리다 is to ring out/sound. bell noise sounds out)

징글벨이 울리다
 for jinglebell to ring/sound out

썰매의 방울 소리가 듣다
 to hear sleigh bells ring
(to hear the sound of a sleighs bell)

새해
new year
(Jan 1st. All koreans age one year on this day. One year old at birth and one more year each new year. So a baby born on Dec 31st will be 2 years old the very next day!) 

새해 복 많이 받으세요
happy new year
(receive alot of new year luck)

설날
the korean new year / lunar new year
(This marks the beginning of the lunar calendar and is a 3 day celebration. Many people get time off work for this. The new year expression 새해 복 많이 받으세요 may also be used on this new year as well)

진저브레드하우스 만들다 / 진저브레드맨 만들다
to make a gingerbread house/man
-> i found this adorable video http://naver.me/5z30JZCX

겨우살이 
mistletoe

겨우살이 아래에서 뽀뽀하다 
to kiss under the mistle toe

EXAMPLE SENTENCES

눈송이 하나하나가 모두 특별해요
Each snowflake is unique


크리스마스 트리 꼭대기에 별을 놓으세요
Put the star on top of the tree
(-> 꼭대기 summit/apex)

만약 겨우살이 아래에서 어떤 사람을 만나면 뽀뽀해야 돼요
If you happen to meet someone under the mistletoe you have to kiss

날 겨우살이 아래에서 만나줘
Meet me under the mistletoe
->(informal cause I feel you’d only say this to like a spouse or something but formal would be 절 겨우살이 아래에서 만나주세요) 날 short for 나를 and 절 short for 저를)

9마리의 순록이 산타할아버지 썰매를 끌어요
9 reindeer pull santas sleigh

어느 안개 낀 크리스마스 이브에 산타할아버지는 루돌프한테 내 썰매를 이끌어 줄 수 있냐고 물어보셨어요
On a foggy christmas eve, santa asked Rudolph if he could guide his sleigh

다른 순록은 루돌프를 비웃었었어요
The other reindeer used to make fun of rudolph

엘프들은 산타할아버지한테 인형을 만들어줘요
Elves make toys for santa

이번 겨울에 눈이 쌓이면 좋겠어요 
I hope it snows this year (and that it sticks)

________________________

~Shelbi